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Portland Fish Exchange

Trawl nets being stretched and mended in the ‘Net-Yard’ - located adjacent to the Fish Exchange

Portland Fish Exchange

The F/V Aaron Melissa preparing to offload fresh, Gulf of Maine groundfish at Pier #1 of the Exchange

Portland Fish Exchange

Baskets of groundfish coming from the hold into the unloading hopper

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange staff verifies individual fish for accurate culling weight using electronic scales

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange staff sorts groundfish by species and cull

Portland Fish Exchange

The scale master scans, weighs and bar-codes each individual container of groundfish

Portland Fish Exchange

Containers of groundfish are stacked & iced onto pallets in the backfield and tagged with the bar coded label

Portland Fish Exchange

Completed ‘lots’ of groundfish are arranged & displayed in the Exchange’s temperature controlled cooler for inspection by registered buyers

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange has one of the largest refrigerated spaces in the State!

Portland Fish Exchange

Buyers and sellers are seated at the Exchanges auction room computers preparing for the Internet Auction

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange provides after-auction reprocessing services for our buyer clients to expedite shipments to larger metropolitan cities

Portland Fish Exchange

Exchange staff ‘steaking’ large pollock for boxing and shipment to the New Fulton Market in New York

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange expedites loading buyers and LTL carriers using our fleet of forklifts and powered pallet jacks

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange not only handles just groundfish – but can accommodate large trips of pelagic species – like tuna & swordfish and provides space to unload herring and menhaden harvesting vessels

WASHINGTON POST ›

‘They be pirates’

AUGUST 02, 2018

CEDROS, Trinidad and Tobago — In the flickers of sunlight off the cobalt blue of the Caribbean sea, the vessel appeared as a cut on the horizon. It sailed closer. But the crew of the Asheena took no heed.

“We be lookin’ for our red fish as normal, thinkin’ they be fishin’, too,” said Jimmy Lalla, 36, part of the crew that had dropped lines in Trinidadian waters last April a few miles off the lawless Venezuelan coast.

The other vessel kept approaching. “They be needin’ help?” Lalla recalled wondering as it pulled aside their 28-foot pirogue. A short, sinewy man jumped on board, shouting in Spanish and waving a pistol.

“Then we knowin’,” Lalla said. “They be pirates.” rest of story