Photo Gallery
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Portland Fish Exchange

Trawl nets being stretched and mended in the ‘Net-Yard’ - located adjacent to the Fish Exchange

Portland Fish Exchange

The F/V Aaron Melissa preparing to offload fresh, Gulf of Maine groundfish at Pier #1 of the Exchange

Portland Fish Exchange

Baskets of groundfish coming from the hold into the unloading hopper

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange staff verifies individual fish for accurate culling weight using electronic scales

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange staff sorts groundfish by species and cull

Portland Fish Exchange

The scale master scans, weighs and bar-codes each individual container of groundfish

Portland Fish Exchange

Containers of groundfish are stacked & iced onto pallets in the backfield and tagged with the bar coded label

Portland Fish Exchange

Completed ‘lots’ of groundfish are arranged & displayed in the Exchange’s temperature controlled cooler for inspection by registered buyers

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange has one of the largest refrigerated spaces in the State!

Portland Fish Exchange

Buyers and sellers are seated at the Exchanges auction room computers preparing for the Internet Auction

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange provides after-auction reprocessing services for our buyer clients to expedite shipments to larger metropolitan cities

Portland Fish Exchange

Exchange staff ‘steaking’ large pollock for boxing and shipment to the New Fulton Market in New York

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange expedites loading buyers and LTL carriers using our fleet of forklifts and powered pallet jacks

Portland Fish Exchange

The Exchange not only handles just groundfish – but can accommodate large trips of pelagic species – like tuna & swordfish and provides space to unload herring and menhaden harvesting vessels

You

MEG WILCOX SEPTEMBER 11, 2018

A unique international partnership is helping entrepreneurs in Maine bring sustainable, farmed sea scallops to the U.S. market.

Bangs Island Mussels’ farm manager Jon Gorman heads out on Casco Bay, off of Portland, Maine, in a blue and white fishing boat named Le Cozze(Italian for mussels). He motors past one of the rafts where the company is growing mussels and on to a more unusual venture: Bangs Island’s new sea scallop farm.

Gorman cuts the engine and drops the anchor, under the watchful eyes of harbor seals lounging on a nearby island. Scallops need cold, nutrient-dense water to grow, and Maine’s protected bays provide the ideal environment.

Cranking a winch, Gorman and his crew pull up a taut, algae-covered rope from the depths of Casco Bay’s gray water. Leaning over the side, they haul out a lantern net, a long, box-shaped structure that serves as a scallop nursery, onto the deck. Gorman reaches into one of the lantern net’s 10 compartments and pulls out a handful of golden-brown scallop shells, about the size of old-fashioned silver dollars. rest of story